Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

BuzzFeed, Find Your New Favorite Thing
    0 0

    All caused by that one guy… A Vine story by BuzzFeed BFF starring Matt Bellassai.

    It all starts when someone you don't even know invites themselves to your party.

    vine.co

    That person who doesn't get how backyard BBQ works.

    vine.co

    When someone eats all the food before you get to it.

    vine.co

    OK, just this guy.

    vine.co


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    If you like happiness and laughter, follow us.

    BuzzFeed's BFF division is a team of artists, designers, writers, and video producers whose entire mission is to bring more joy to your life via social. You should follow us on Instagram now to make every day a little more delightful.

    First: watch me whip.

    instagram.com

    With BFF, your priorities are understood.

    instagram.com

    Life tips you can actually use.

    instagram.com


    View Entire List ›


    0 0
  • 08/07/15--15:36: Who We Love And Who We Eat
  • Cecil the lion’s death has sparked an outrage I’ve been feeling all my life, but I’m not sure how I feel about it.

    Will Varner / BuzzFeed

    My parents rented the movie Gorillas in the Mist for me when I was 10. I had always loved animals, and I devoured nonfiction books on their brains and emotions, from books ranking the intelligence of various dog breeds to the memoirs of famous zookeeper Joan Embery. The movie was an acclaimed biopic about the groundbreaking work of naturalist Dian Fossey and the group of gorillas she studied in Rwanda. My mom thought it would likely become a new favorite.

    I sat on our living room couch, sandwiched between my two smart and thoughtful parents, who let me watch just about any movie I was interested in. The film as I remember it slowly and deliberately introduces the gorillas to Fossey and to the viewers. She gives them names. She loves them. They show her their personalities, their emotions, and their commitment to their family. Then, local hunters come and kill the gorillas, intending to sell their hands and heads to tourists. I think it's about halfway through the film, but it's the last scene of the movie I've seen to this day. I remember the scene as violent, painfully realistic, almost macabre. I started screaming at the top of my lungs. Tears streaming down my face, hyperventilating, terrified of my own emotions, unable to comprehend how this could happen, how anyone could do something like this. I was inconsolable. My mom recalls the incident vividly 23 years later, saying it's the most upset she's ever seen me. I look back on the moment as a turning point in my life when I realized that I see animals differently than most people do.

    I thought of the gorillas, and my childhood depths of despair, when I was reading about the recent death of Cecil the lion. Cecil was killed by an American dentist in a trophy hunt, a common practice in Africa that results in around 500 lion deaths every year (not to mention elephants, giraffes, and other animals). His death seems to have been technically illegal, specifically because he was lured out of one kind of protected land and into another. Cecil had a name and was beloved (by tourists) on the wildlife preserve he called home. His death has led to tears, calls for change, and countless think pieces. I understand all of this grief. I cried too when I saw the photos of the dentist posing next to such a huge and majestic dead body. Even the poachers in Rwanda had a reason: bringing in money they could share with their families. But this rich American paid for the experience, he did it for fun — how strange and sick he must be.

    Although I find Cecil's death disgusting and unnecessary, I share a concern I've seen friends express in different ways over these last couple weeks: Why this? An individual is more than capable of caring about more than one issue or injustice at a time, and many of us do, but Cecil news has dominated the cycle of chatter and outrage for over a week and counting. It's fair to ask why certain victims receive an outpouring of attention while other victims are ignored or worse. If you're publicly mourning Cecil but you aren't moved by the big game trophy hunting that happens everywhere, or the atrocious human rights violations taking place in other countries, or by police officers who shoot unarmed and nonviolent teenagers, it becomes fair to ask: Why now? Why this life?

    Me and my first cat, Tigger.

    Bill Burton

    Two years after I watched Gorillas in the Mist, I declared myself a vegetarian. I'd spent the preceding months pondering the ethical ramifications of meat-eating, reading as much as I could find about animal rights philosophy, and building myself up to the official decision — mostly by getting into arguments with family friends about why eating meat was bad and wrong.

    I immediately found that adults liked to argue with me about my vegetarianism. Often, their case boiled down to the differences between farm animals and the other kinds of animals I loved that had led me to this decision. There's a hierarchy of which animals humans are supposed to care for and protect and which ones we raise in captivity and slaughter, but those divisions are convoluted and contradictory. In the U.S., we sign petitions against other countries eating dogs — and yet we euthanize over a million unwanted dogs a year and throw them in dumpsters. We race and slaughter horses, but most people refuse to eat them. We read our kids stories about ugly ducklings and then go to fancy restaurants to eat foie gras, a duck's unnaturally swollen liver caused by weeks of forced tube-feeding. In other countries, they eat some of the animals we love, and love some of the animals we eat. Even my own decisions about animals are complicated: I'm now a vegan, but I have two cats who have to eat meat to be healthy.

    These divisions have little to do with any facts about animal intelligence, sentience, or emotion. Farm animals aren't like machines or plants. Pigs are smarter than dogs. Cows like to be cuddled and they cry when their babies are taken away. Chickens can reason.

    "Well," these arguments often conclude, "it's OK that it's arbitrary. Humans are special; we're different from other animals, so we can decide who to mourn and who to eat." This is most often where people turn in the end: "Humans, we're different. We're the boss."

    This point feels like a parent extinguishing a line of questioning with "because I said so." The question still remains: Why are we special? I understand why people feel more empathy for their own kind than for others, but not how that feeling leads to any logical justification or ethical code. Still, even if I just pretend to get it, let's say humans are special…what kind of special do you really want to be? Isn't having dominion over the earth a great reason to rise above unnecessary cruelty? Don't we want to cause as little suffering as we can? Why not?

    In the U.S. alone we slaughtered 9.1 billion land animals for food last year. That's more animals killed to be eaten in the United States than there are human beings on planet Earth. When someone asks how a person who advocates for animals can care "more" about animals than we do about fellow humans, I think they're misunderstanding the kind of problem animal rights advocates are trying to solve; it's cruelty and death on a scale that would literally extinguish human beings from the planet a few times over.


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    Like the best part of newspapers, but even better because it’s on the internet.

    Rubyetc for BuzzFeed Comics

    Nathan Pyle for BuzzFeed Comics

    Do you miss finding the comics section of the Sunday paper and looking for your favorite strip? Do you love supporting original art and cool illustration but you're not sure where to find it? Do you just love finding stuff that you can actually relate to and share with your friends? Something exciting you should know: BuzzFeed Comics publishes all new original comics every single day to Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    Life can be confusing and hard. Sometimes, though, it’s the absolute best.

    1. Putting on clothes that just came out of the dryer.
    2. Peaches in season.
    3. Seeing old people who are super in love.
    4. Nose freckles that only come out in the summertime.
    5. The sound of fingers on a fretboard you only hear at acoustic shows and folk recordings.
    6. The way a home run sounds coming off the bat.
    7. When you can get the tip of your finger inside the middle of your cat's paw and their claws can't reach you.
    8. Hearing a song you used to love and had completely forgotten about.
    9. When you take a selfie outside and the sunbeams cut across your face.
    10. The way you feel when you lie in the sand at the beach for a long time.
    11. Breakfast tacos.

    instagram.com

    12. When the only open parking spot is waiting for you right by the door.
    13. Hearing kids playing games outside.
    14. The feeling of relief when someone likes you back.
    15. Frozen grapes.
    16. Wildflowers.
    17. When you post something hoping one particular person will like it and then THEY DO.
    18. When someone's eyelashes make a shadow under their eyes.
    19. The way old books smell.
    20. Slurpees.
    21. When you see a wild animal and instead of running away it stops and stares at you for a while.
    22. The feeling right after a really good haircut.
    23. This Vine:

    vine.co


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    Fall! See what I did there?

    It's that time.

    View Video ›

    facebook.com

    Or, depending on where you live, it's almost that time.

    View Video ›

    facebook.com

    In any case, we're SO ready.

    View Video ›

    facebook.com

    BuzzFeed Comics is always ready.

    View Video ›

    facebook.com


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    It’s good to be gotten.

    Because they understand you even when no one else does.

    View Video ›

    facebook.com

    Because of all the near-misses (and actual disasters) they got you through.

    Because of all the near-misses (and actual disasters) they got you through.

    Jen Lewis / BuzzFeed

    Because they always know exactly when you need them to be cheesy.

    Because they always know exactly when you need them to be cheesy.

    Jen Lewis / BuzzFeed

    And when you just need help with something only they could possibly get.

    And when you just need help with something only they could possibly get.

    the-best-of-funny.info


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    Cows are really cute and wonderful!!!

    Sometimes it seems like cows get a bad rap. They're big, slow, and some people seem to think they're not as cute as fuzzy bunnies or happy dogs. Those people are wrong. Cows are emotional, social animals who make and keep best friends, love physical affection, show an appreciation for music, and are deeply curious about other creatures and the world around them. They're also ADORABLE. If you need proof that cows are some of the gentlest and most lovable creatures on planet earth, keep scrolling.

    "Hey, we're cows."

    Cows love TLC. Just look at this calf getting his chin scritched!

    vine.co

    When they get a chance to meet a dog, cows will often gather the whole herd together to check 'em out. This one got a lick in.


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    Have you seen someone Whine About It in the wild? Leave your sightings in the comments!

    If you don't know Matt Bellassai, he's a writer at BuzzFeed who we pay to get drunk and whine about stuff at his desk. His weekly video series Whine About It comes out every Wednesday on Facebook and Tumblr, where his complaints about children, being an adult, dating, and most recently Halloween are viewed by millions every week. Apparently, Matt has inspired some folks so much that they decided to dress as him for Halloween — clever, since the costume basically requires lugging an entire bottle of wine around everywhere you go.

    Here are my favorite Whine About It costumes I've seen so far — leave yours in the comments!

    instagram.com

    instagram.com


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    Cancer: laughing at farts, tender makeouts.

    Summer Anne Burton / BuzzFeed

    Summer Anne Burton / BuzzFeed

    Summer Anne Burton / BuzzFeed

    Summer Anne Burton / BuzzFeed


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    :) :) :)

    These cows who think this dog is their kid.

    vine.co

    A lamb who is having a very good time.

    vine.co

    This piglet who loves belly rubs.

    vine.co

    This chipmunk trying to figure out what he can fit into his mouth.

    vine.co


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    Presented in alphabetical order.

    Bad Bad Hats / Via badbadhats.com

    Sounds like: No-bullshit, ultra-dynamic '90s-style alt rock in the tradition of Liz Phair, the Breeders, and That Dog. Kerry Alexander's lyrics are as sharp as her songs are catchy.
    Sample tracks: "Midway," "Say Nothing," "Psychic Reader"

    Sounds like: Kinda like if Pavement was fronted by a brainy Australian woman. Barnett's lyrics are consistently brilliant, and she has a gift for juxtaposing mundane, funny details with heartbreaking lines about trying to keep your head together.
    Sample tracks: "Pedestrian at Best," "Nobody Really Cares If You Don't Go to the Party," "Depreston"

    Sounds like: Gorgeous shoegaze music built around electric organ drones and airy guitar arpeggios. The band put out two albums this year: Depression Cherry, which leans a bit more ethereal, and Thank Your Lucky Stars, which sounds a little more grungy and scuffed up.
    Sample tracks: "Sparks" and "Levitation" from Depression Cherry; "One Thing" from Thank Your Lucky Stars.


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    Maximum affinity reached. (Minor spoilers included.)

    One day you were playing Fallout 4 and after slaying some super mutants and feral ghouls, you wandered into a secret hideaway and met this raggedy dumpster named Deacon.

    One day you were playing Fallout 4 and after slaying some super mutants and feral ghouls, you wandered into a secret hideaway and met this raggedy dumpster named Deacon.

    Bethesda Softworks / Via fallout.wikia.com

    Bethesda Softworks


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    :) :) :)

    この犬を自分の子供と思っている牛たち

    vine.co

    ノリノリの子羊

    vine.co

    おなかをかいてもらうのが大好きな子ブタちゃん

    vine.co

    自分のお口に何がちょうどいいか試しているリス

    vine.co


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    This is a story about a lifetime’s supply of cardboard, duct tape, rope, and string, a full day of construction, and one very happy cat named Jenkins.

    youtube.com

    This is Jenkins.

    This is Jenkins.

    He likes to keep abreast of world affairs.

    He likes to keep abreast of world affairs.


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    いい歳して…なんて言わないで。

    youtube.com

    僕の猫、ジェンキンズ。

    僕の猫、ジェンキンズ。

    世界情勢を追うのが好きなオス猫です。

    世界情勢を追うのが好きなオス猫です。


    View Entire List ›


    0 0
  • 03/23/16--05:00: How Sexually Pure Are You?
  • Settle in. This purity test is comprehensive.

    Think Stock


    0 0

    All the songs – album tracks, B-sides, that one Bond song, and the songs from the brand-new A Moon Shaped Pool – listed in definitive order.

    XL Recordings

    XL Recordings

    160. "MK 2," In Rainbows: Discbox
    — Is this a song? It's included here because it appears as a separate track on the bonus disc from In Rainbows, but reasonable people could certainly disagree. Classic example of the sonic bits n pieces that hang around some of Radiohead's later albums. (SL)

    159. "MK 1," In Rainbows: Discbox
    — See "MK 2," above. (SL)

    158. "Where Bluebirds Fly," There There (single)

    157. "Fast-Track," Pyramid Song (single)

    156. "I Am Citizen Insane," Go to Sleep (single)

    155. "Trans-Atlantic Drawl," Pyramid Song (single)

    154. "Million Dollar Question," Creep (single)

    153. "Pop Is Dead," Pop Is Dead (single)
    — The video for this song is just delightfully weird! Radiohead at their most campy. Guitarist Ed O'Brien once called the song "a hideous mistake." (SL)

    152. "Melatonin," Paranoid Android (single)

    151. "Treefingers," Kid A
    — As opposed to everything so far on the list, this song appeared on a full album, and while it doesn't really stand on its own, at least in the context of an album it makes sense, marking a transition on Kid A between the pensive "How To Disappear Completely" and more straightforward rock of "Optimistic." (SL)


    View Entire List ›


    0 0
  • 10/30/16--06:01: What Vine Did For Us
  • "Forty-five seconds is a really long video,” I squawked a little too loudly on a recent call. We were discussing a digital video plan for a client and trying to settle on the right length for a series of commercials. “Forty-five seconds is, like, you need a storyboard,” I explained. Eventually, we all agreed. We switched gears and started discussing what kinds of stories you could tell in just 15 seconds, at which point I interjected again — "Man, even that's long! That's, like, almost three Vines!"

    When Vine came out in January 2013, the constraints seemed almost laughable. A six-second video, fully shot and edited in an app on your phone with very few bells and whistles, that looped eternally. My friends and colleagues experimented with using it like Instagram, posting six-second clips of whatever was happening in our lives. My early Vines are pretty much all of one adorable corgi puppy that I had the pleasure of babysitting regularly soon after I moved to New York, a weird little snapshot into a very specific few months of my life — barely more than photos with sound.

    Meanwhile, something else was happening with Vine among people a few years younger than me, especially teenagers. They were turning it into an art form.

    Kids were the perfect audience for Vine. It felt almost laughably on point with all the stereotypes about young people and their short attention spans. But rather than reinforcing the idea that changing consumption habits means we’re dumbing down, the constraints of Vine ended up cultivating the most incredible, diverse creative culture I’ve seen in decades of paying attention to what people make online. Vine was deeply accessible, which meant anyone with a smartphone could make one. But it was also a deeply creative platform, created from scratch. It felt like a fresh, pure, artistic meritocracy. On Vine, stars were born and went viral thanks to work that never would have existed without the platform itself.

    Vine created its own memes, language, and trends, which were often magnified by thousands of others jumping on board with riffs and adaptations as soon as a new viral Vine landed — see the evolution of "I'm in me mum's car, broom broom." There were Vine magicians, Vine musicians, Vine kids, and — of course, because it’s the internet — lots and lots of very adorable Vine animals. Of course, there was also the comedy. Some of it was pretty bad — cute white teenage boys became Vine stars not so much because they were creative, but because they were willing to humiliate themselves, and garner tweenage girl fans in the process. Still, a ton of the humor on Vine was warm, self-deprecating, weird, and completely unexpected. Who is she? What are thoooooose?

    I mean: Why you always lyin'?

    vine.co

    In fall of 2014, BuzzFeed formed a team called BFF that was focused entirely on experimenting with creating original distributed content for platforms we hadn't really paid much attention to before. Previously, we were more singularly focused on driving traffic to our website. This was a chance to exist everywhere the internet went. The BFF team was comprised of a dozen writers, performers, video producers, artists, photographers, and designers — many of them were hired for one of those specific skills, but eventually all of them were doing all of the above by the very nature of the collaborative creative environment and the platforms we were working on. Writers got in front of the camera, illustrators put together long Tumblr posts, photographers shot videos of puppies re-creating the Friends theme song. We focused mostly on emerging platforms: Tumblr, Imgur, Instagram, and especially Vine.

    I didn't really set out to master Vine when we started BFF, but we wanted to learn more about it. I hired Jeremy Briggs, who'd co-founded a Vine-for-brands company, Origiful, in San Francisco after leaving a video role at Twitter. Jeremy taught us the basics of what worked on Vine, and we set our team of weirdos loose. They called us mom and dad, and in many ways they channeled the teenagers who had made Vine this incredible, unique planet of internet. Everyone on the team contributed to Vine and pushed each other to be better. People who didn't really have video skills learned from those who did. One of our first big successes came from Kaye Toal, who I'd hired primarily to write for Tumblr. The video is just Kaye saying "yaaaassss" over clips from the new Jurassic Park trailer. She made it at home one night and brought it to us the next day, probably to make everyone in our Slack room laugh. It has 18 million loops.

    As a manager of creative people, fostering a creative culture and keeping people inspired to experiment and innovate is both the hardest and the most important thing you can do. I'm not trying to sell myself short, but Vine did a lot of the work for me. When you're brainstorming or trying to write a book or, really, accomplish anything ever, it helps to start with what you can't do. Limitless options are paralyzing. Six seconds is approachable and down-to-earth, easy to understand, comfortingly qualified. We constantly tried to push the limits of what we could do with that format, but those same limits were what inspired us to make anything at all.

    A BFF/BuzzFeed Vine made by Jesse McLaren.

    vine.co


    When I was a kid, my dad used to tell a (possibly apocryphal) story about how when he was in elementary school, he once intentionally scored 0 on a true/false test to make a point to his teacher, and then tried to argue that it was just as hard to get 0 as it would be to get 100. The teacher didn't buy it, but when I pictured my dad in this scenario I saw him as a young Ferris Bueller — unreasonably clever and creative, but upending expectations and conscientiously refusing to apply his academic virtues to anything a grown-up would understand or approve of.

    Vine's almost laughably restrictive format was exactly the same kind of impish challenge. Oh, you think six-second video is silly? I'll show you silly. The result was a flourishing, supportive creative culture that had deep cultural impact way beyond the number of active users on the app itself.

    Vine may have been the internet's first real native art movement — less like a standard Silicon Valley startup, and more like Warhol's factory.

    Vine wasn't a perfect place — like any open platform, Vine had its own share of trolls, racist and misogynistic humor, and jerks who got ahead by stealing from more talented people. Still, it was just packed with magic — particularly from the young people of color who understood the format best. This was a place reserved for joy, laughter, and celebration, a remarkable service in an America where young minorities have to assert that their lives matter at all. A quick glance through Twitter trending topics where people have been memorializing their favorite Vines is like an unintentional textbook on what real diversity looks like.

    I feel a little guilty about Twitter shutting down Vine, because I had fallen off as a daily user of the platform in the last few months — and so, it seemed, had a lot of other people I know. Many of the early Vine stars moved on to other platforms in the last year or so. BuzzFeed's own Vine account has scarcely been updated for months. Vine suffered, too, from questions around how it could successfully generate enough revenue to sustain itself — brands paid Vine superstars to endorse their products, but Twitter wasn't seeing a cut of those deals, and because viral Vines generally spread off of Vine itself, ads within the app probably didn't hold much appeal. Still, there's a lot of anger toward Twitter about this decision — a lengthy thread of tweets on the subject of why Twitter is shuttering Vine while still struggling with its harassment issues has already garnered thousands of retweets and favorites.

    Everything comes to an end eventually. It's sad now, but Vine's short-lived but world-changing impact still makes me feel incredibly optimistic about the future of entertainment and the internet. Art is easy. Art is whatever we made it to be. Anyone can do it; do it for the Vine.


    vine.co

    Summer Anne Burton is executive creative producer at BuzzFeed and works in its advertising department. Previously she ran BuzzFeed BFF, which made a lot of Vines.


    0 0

    For your dad(dy figure), the generic Father’s Day card you can buy at the mall just isn’t gonna cut it. We got you.

    PS BuzzFeed gets a cut if you send one of these cards!

    Send this card to someone whose positive example of masculinity once caused you to whisper, "Not all dads."

    Send this card to someone whose positive example of masculinity once caused you to whisper, "Not all dads."

    Shayna Brewer / BuzzFeed

    Send this card to your dad who's tough but not so tough that he won't squeal just a little at the image of a bulldog puppy in a leather jacket.

    Send this card to your dad who's tough but not so tough that he won't squeal just a little at the image of a bulldog puppy in a leather jacket.

    Will Smith / BuzzFeed

    Send this card to the dad who's always got that slang almost right.

    Send this card to the dad who's always got that slang almost right.

    Tyler Naugle / BuzzFeed


    View Entire List ›